Tag Archives: hot water

Tankless Water Heaters in Your House: Pros and Cons

Tankless Water Heaters in Your House: Pros and ConsIf your older storage tank water heater is getting close to retirement age, you may be wondering if it’s worth going tankless. To help you decide, it’s good to learn the pros and cons of this type of water heater. The first pro of switching to a tankless water heater is the range of options it gives you. You can choose between gas-fired and electric models, and select a size ranging from a small unit to serve a single bathroom, or a large, whole-house model that’s capable of supplying three showers simultaneously.

Additional Benefits of Tankless Water Heaters

Making the switch to tankless water heating offers a number of other benefits:

  • Energy savings. Because there’s no tank of water that needs to be kept hot and ready for use, you can expect to see a drop in your household energy consumption and utility bills.
  • Long-term reliability. Storage tank water heaters typically wear out after 10 –13 years. As they age, the risk of a catastrophic tank failure and significant water damage increases. In contrast, tankless units have an expected service life of roughly 20 years, and there’s no tank that can suddenly fail.
  • Greater convenience. In the busy mornings and any other times when hot water is in greater demand, it’s easy to run out when you have a storage tank water heater. When you have on-demand units installed that match your peak household usage, you’ll assured of a continuous supply whenever hot water is needed.
  • Placement choices. Tankless units take up little room and are often wall mounted. The only restrictions on where you can place one are access to your gas line and the need for outdoor venting.

Potential Cons of Going Tankless

Tankless water heaters can cost two to three times as much as storage tank units, and the installation can cost more if your gas service needs upgrading. However, the reliability, convenience and energy savings you’ll gain can make the extra expense worthwhile.

For personalized advice about whether a tankless water heater is the ideal choice for your Portland-area home, contact us at Roth Heating & Cooling.

Our goal is to help educate our customers in the Metro Portland, Oregon area about energy and home comfort issues (specific to HVAC systems).

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During Cold Spells, Don’t Forget to Bundle Up Your Water Heater

During Cold Spells, Don't Forget to Bundle Up Your Water HeaterThe costs of water heating ranges from 14 to 20 percent of the average household’s energy budget. That’s plenty of incentive to keep your water heater in good working order — especially during cooler weather. Use these tips to keep a tight lid on your hot water bill this winter, help your system run better and to enjoy uninterrupted hot water service.

Signs of Wear

Take a look at the storage tank. Do you see any rust spots or water stains? These are signs of leaky gaskets. Ask your service provider to inspect the unit.

Another sign that your water heater needs professional maintenance is fluctuating hot water temperatures. Common causes for this are a failing heating element, sediment buildup inside the tank, a broken dip tube or faulty thermostat.

Temperature Check

If your water heater is heating up water greater than 120 degrees, you’re wasting energy. Use a thermometer to check hot water temperature at a faucet. Turn back the temperature dial a notch and wait a few hours before checking water temperature again.

Insulation

Inefficient water heaters lose more heat energy through the sides, top and bottom of the tank. This is called standby heat loss, and makes your system work harder — use more energy — to keep stored water at a consistent temperature. Insulation jackets and sleeves for the storage tank help reduce standby heat loss, reduce wear, and save you money.

You should also insulate the pipes at the storage tank, under sinks and at your clothes washer. Insulating pipe sleeves increase water temperature, reduce waiting time and save you money, too.

Drain the Tank

If you don’t flush out your storage tank once a year, you are flushing money down the drain. Mineral and sediment buildup inside the tank reduce heating efficiency and shorten the lifespan of your water heater. Your service provider should flush the tank during preventive service. However, you should drain a gallon of water at the temperature pressure and relief valve every couple of months.

For professional water heater assistance, contact us at Roth Heating & Cooling. We’ve served Portland-area residents since 1976!

Our goal is to help educate our customers in the Metro Portland, Oregon area about energy and home comfort issues (specific to HVAC systems).

Credit/Copyright Attribution: “geralt/Pixabay”

Water Heater Sizing: Does Your Home Need More Than One?

Water Heater Sizing: Does Your Home Need More Than One?If you have a long wait between turning on your faucet or showerhead and getting hot water, you may think that there’s nothing you can do about it. It just takes as long as it takes, right?

The truth is, there is a solution that many homeowners aren’t aware of – installing multiple tankless water heaters near the points of demand is the solution.

What is a Point of Demand?

Any point where you need hot water to come out is called a point of demand. This includes your kitchen sink, washing machine, showers, and bathroom sinks.

How Does a Tankless Water Heater Work?

First, let’s think about a traditional water heater. With this type of water heater, water fills up a large tank. The water is heated up, then kept at the same hot temperature while it waits to be used. When you turn on a hot water tap, the water flows from the tank to your point of demand.

This system has pros and cons:

  • Pro: Stores a lot of hot water
  • Con: Uses energy to keep the water hot all the time
  • Con: Can be susceptible to rusting out and flooding your home

A tankless water heater is a much smaller unit that’s installed on a wall along the path of the pipe. When you turn on the hot water tap, water flows through the pipes and also through the tankless heater. Inside the tankless heater, the water is warmed up before it finishes its journey to your faucet.

Because tankless heaters are not as large as traditional models, it’s possible to place one near each main point of demand in your home. This allows hot water to get to your tap faster, reducing the wasted water that runs down your drain while you wait for it to heat up.

Additional Pros and Cons:

  • Pro: Requires less energy because they are not keeping water hot at all times
  • Pro: Avoids the “rusted out” problem of traditional models
  • Con: Higher initial investment

Need more information about how multiple water heaters can help in your Portland-area home? Contact Roth Heating & Cooling today.

Our goal is to help educate our customers in the Metro Portland, Oregon area about energy and home comfort issues (specific to HVAC systems).

Credit/Copyright Attribution: “guilaine/Pixabay”

Common Issues Water Heaters Present to Portland Area Homeowners

Common Issues Water Heaters Present to Portland Area HomeownersYou may not even notice the hard-working water heater humming along in your basement or utility closet until troublesome issues arise. Identifying water heater problems quickly and calling in a plumbing professional to make needed repairs is the best way to avoid any headaches or inconvenience. Here’s how to diagnose the most common water heater issues.

No Hot Water

If you suddenly have no hot water, check whether the heater’s pilot light has gone out. If you’re comfortable doing so, you can attempt to re-light it according to the manufacturer’s instructions. If you have an electric model, the element may have failed. A pro can pinpoint the exact cause and get it fixed quickly.

Loud Popping Sounds

Unusual noises from inside a water heater tank are typically caused by scale and sediment buildup in the heat exchanger or on the electric elements. It’s wise to have the water heater drained to remove accumulated sediment as soon as possible. If it’s not addressed, scale buildup can eventually ruin the tank.

Drop in Water Temperature

A noticeable drop in water temperature can signal trouble with the thermostat, a deteriorated dip tube or sediment buildup. Increasing the heater’s thermostat setting may work as a short-term fix. For a long-term solution, have the unit examined by an experienced technician.

Water Leakage

If water is seeping out the tank, it’s vital to find the source. Check around the pressure relief valve, drain valve, electric elements and gas control valve. A leaky pipe on top of the tank or a corroded welded seam are other possible culprits. Once you have the source identified, a pro can repair the issue or advise whether replacing the heater is necessary to prevent a plumbing emergency.

Low Hot Water Pressure

Several water heater issues can cause low hot water pressure, including a malfunctioning shut off valve or sediment clogging the tank, water lines or dip tube. A licensed plumber can determine the cause and get the issue resolved.

For expert help solving water heater problems in your Portland home, contact the pros at Roth Heating & Cooling.

Our goal is to help educate our customers in the Metro Portland area about energy and home comfort issues (specific to HVAC systems).

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