Tag Archives: fall season

Daylight Saving Time Checklist: Your HVAC System

Daylight Saving Time Checklist: Your HVAC SystemDaylight saving time (DST) ends November 5, 2017, which means it will be time to change the clocks and your programmable thermostat one hour back. It’s easier to remember how to set it by thinking about springing forward in the spring and falling back in the autumn.

The purpose of the time change was to save energy by reducing the amount of indoor lighting required in the summer. It has proved marginally successful for this purpose. Much greater energy savings have come from more efficient HVAC systems, lighting, stricter building codes and appliances. Efforts to overturn DST have met with resistance because people enjoy longer daylight hours while the weather is comfortable outdoors.

Changing the Thermostat

Some types of programmable thermostats are fairly intuitive, but if yours isn’t, you may need to consult the owner’s manual to reset it. Most manufacturers provide these manuals online if you’ve misplaced yours.

It’s also a good idea to change the batteries for the thermostat when you adjust the time for daylight saving time. Without working batteries, the thermostat won’t be able to turn the HVAC system on. Most programmable thermostat covers are easy to take off by twisting or prying the covers off, or removing a few screws.

Changing the Temperatures

Unlike summer, chances are you’ll want the home warmer during the day and cooler at night. As you prepare to change from DST to standard time, set the thermostat for optimal energy savings.

Turning the temperature down at night helps you sleep better and save energy. While you’re home during the day, a setting of 68 degrees F is comfortable for most. You may also want to increase the daytime temperatures during the weekends when your family is at home.

Adjusting the thermostat for the end of daylight saving time will give you better temperature control for winter. If you need help with this project or haven’t had your system serviced for winter, please contact Roth Heating & Cooling, providing trusted HVAC services for Portland area homeowners.

Our goal is to help educate our customers in the Metro Portland, Oregon area about energy and home comfort issues (specific to HVAC systems).

Credit/Copyright Attribution: “thatpalletguy/Pixabay”

Breathe Easy: Know These Fall Air Quality Concerns

Breathe Easy: Know These Fall Air Quality ConcernsFall in Oregon means spectacular leaf colors and cooler temperatures. However, fall also means there could be a decrease in indoor air quality in your home. The following information outlines some of these fall air quality concerns and what can be done about them.

Common Fall Air Quality Concerns

  • Airborne contaminants: Airborne contaminants in your home can increase with fall weather. If you’re opening your windows to enjoy some cool autumn air, you could also be letting in particulates and other airborne contaminants from the outdoors. Dust, dirt, and other common particulates are just as likely to be present in the fall as any other time of the year.
  • High humidity: Humidity in the fall can be just as high as at other times of the year. Inside your home, increased humidity can make it easier for mold to grow. High humidity levels can also cause your indoor spaces to feel uncomfortable.
  • Lack of ventilation: At the opposite end of fall comfort, you may find it necessary to close your windows to keep out an unexpected chill. If temperatures drop far enough, you’ll need to close the windows and keep them closed. This reduces air circulation and ventilation inside your home, which can contribute to decreased air quality.

What to Do

  • Increase ventilation: Many fall air quality concerns can be reduced with better ventilation. Open windows when possible. Use window air conditioners on fan-only settings. Put in a whole-house ventilation system that keeps a steady airflow moving throughout your home.
  • Change HVAC air filters: Air filters in your HVAC system help remove airborne contaminants. Make sure you have a clean filter in your heating and cooling systems.
  • Install dehumidifiers: Dehumidifiers remove moisture from your indoor air. Whole-house models can dehumidify an entire home, while smaller portable models can reduce humidity in a single room.

Roth Heating and Cooling provides high-quality HVAC sales, service, and installation in Portland, Hillsboro, Canby, Lake Oswego and the surrounding Oregon communities. Contact us today for more information on fall air quality concerns and how to make sure your indoor air is fresh and clean throughout autumn.

Our goal is to help educate our customers in the Metro Portland, Oregon area about energy and home comfort issues (specific to HVAC systems).

Maintain Your HVAC Safety When Decorating for Halloween

Maintain Your HVAC Safety When Decorating for HalloweenWhen the fall temperatures arrive in Oregon, they’re accompanied by the ghosts and goblins of Halloween. Halloween is the first of the year-end holidays that bring out an interest in decorating homes inside and out. While Halloween decorating can be fun, getting into the spirit of the season shouldn’t compromise HVAC safety.

Here are some tips for keeping your HVAC system and your home safe when decorating for Halloween:

Keep Vents Clear Indoors

The vents on the outdoor unit of your heating and cooling system need to be open so that air can move in or out as needed. If these vents are blocked by Halloween decorations, the system cannot get the airflow it needs, which reduces performance. Indoor decorations blocking vents and registers can prevent warm or cool air from leaving the ductwork.

Allow Air Flow Outside

Both your cooling system and your heating system need an unobstructed source of airflow. Vents provide part of it, but the outdoor unit also needs to have plenty of space around it to ensure that enough air is available. If you put too many decorations on or near the unit, they could impede airflow and cause issues with the HVAC system’s function. In the worst cases, blocked airflow can damage the unit.

Avoid Decorations Inside Your Unit

Spider webs–real ones–can cause problems with the internal components of the outdoor unit. In particular, they can interfere with electrical connections and cause circuit breakers to trip or, in the worse cases, cause components and circuit boards to burn out. Pieces from Halloween decorations that come loose and make their way inside the outdoor unit can have similar effects. Pieces of cotton from artificial webs, bits of cloth or paper from ghost decorations, or even whole decorations could cause problems with your HVAC system if they get inside the unit.

Roth Heating and Cooling has been serving the HVAC needs of customers in Portland, Hillsboro, Canby, and the surrounding Oregon communities for more than forty years. Contact us today for more information on HVAC safety when decorating your home for Halloween and other holidays.

Our goal is to help educate our customers in the Metro Portland, Oregon area about energy and home comfort issues (specific to HVAC systems).

Credit/Copyright Attribution: “Alexas_Fotos/Pixabay”

Roundup: Top Air Filters for Fall Allergies

Roundup: Top Air Filters for Fall AllergiesPortland ranks high among the worst places for airborne allergies, primarily from trees, weeds, and pollen. Fortunately, the best air filters for your HVAC system reduce the irritations that the widespread proliferation of ragweed pollen causes.

Look for its MERV (minimum efficiency reporting value) rating. The scale runs from 1 to 16 and higher numbers indicate the filter traps smaller particles. Some manufacturers have simplified the scale and label their filters as “good, better, and best.”

Filters with MERV ratings from 1 to 4 are equivalent to the “good” designation. Those rated between 5 and 8 are better, and the highest for residential purposes range between 9 and 12.

Pollen particles are small and will pass through filters with MERV ratings 7 and below. Higher MERV rated filters will capture a higher percentage of these particles. Choose a filter with a better designation or whose MERV rating is 9 or higher.

Words of Caution

Before upgrading the filter for your HVAC system, consult your owner’s manual for the highest rated filter you can use with it. Denser filters slow the air flowing through the air handler and putting a filter inside it that exceeds the manufacturer’s recommendation will raise energy bills and may cause system problems.

Many of the best air filters for allergy relief are pleated. They capture more particles because of their greater surface area and denser weave. Because they’re more effective at trapping particles, they need to be checked and replaced more often than lower rated filters.

Running your system with a dirty filter pulls dustier air through the ductwork, which defeats the purpose of using your HVAC system to control pollen and other airborne allergies. Unless the pollen is trapped at the filter, it can continue to circulate through your home’s air wherever else it lands.

Ductwork, carpet, furniture, and window coverings all hang onto these particulates and when they’re disturbed, your allergies may flare up again.

The best air filters can ease your suffering through allergy season and longer. For more information, contact Roth Heating & Cooling, providing trusted HVAC services for Portland-area homeowners.

Our goal is to help educate our customers in the Metro Portland, Oregon area about energy and home comfort issues (specific to HVAC systems).

Credit/Copyright Attribution: “geralt/Pixabay”